Panel Discussion

3 p.m., 8 June 2000
EESAT 130
Reception follows at 5 p.m.

Fruit of the Orchard (FOTO) addresses the ethical, scientific, social, political, and legal dimensions of toxic waste pollution control and its impact on local communities. Environmental problems of the kind encountered in Winona are widespread and difficult to deal with. Because government resources are limited and the burden of proof with regard to scientific evidence is often insurmountable, small communities usually discover that they have few alternatives. This project is intended as a step toward improving public understanding and developing workable alternatives to assist small communities impacted by pollution.

The exhibition in Denton will include a panel discussion by environmental professionals and community activists: Eugene C. Hargrove, editor of the journal, Environmental Ethics; Grover G. Hankins, law professor, Thurgood Marshall School of Law, Texas Southern University; Gerald Carney, chief toxicologist, EPA, Dallas; Bruce Jones, Regional Counsel, EPA, Dallas; Don Wall, environmental reporter, WFAA (ABC), Dallas; and Phyllis Glazer, MOSES. It will be held 8 June 2000 at 3 p.m. in the Environmental Education Science and Technology Building at the University of North Texas. There will be a reception for the photographer and the panelists immediately following the panel discussion in the exhibit hall at 5 p.m.

© 1996 Downtown Winona, Texas

The photo essay is made up of black-and- white photographs taken in and around Winona since October 1995. In 1994, the photographer, Tammy Cromer-Campbell was asked (pro bono) by MOSES to photograph a "poster child," Jeremy, for its campaign to raise public awareness of the dangerous and toxic conditions that exist in Winona. Haunted by Jeremy's honesty, and deeply concerned about what was happening to this community and its residents, she eventually asked MOSES to provide her with the names of other affected residents so that she could document their stories on film. More than 1,000 negatives have been made since October 1995. Of these, Cromer-Campbell has selected 58 images that provide an intimate look at some of the people in the community.

The exhibition was first be hosted by Texas Southern University's Thurgood Marshall School of Law (February 28, 2000 to April 21, 2000). It will move to the University of North Texas's exhibit hall in the Environmental Education Science and Technology Building May 24, 2000 and will be available for viewing until July 28 2000.

The exhibit in Houston included a panel discussion by Eugene C. Hargrove, editor of the journal, Environmental Ethics; Grover G. Hankins, law professor, Thurgood Marshall School of Law, Texas Southern University; and Phyllis Glazer, MOSES.

© American Ecology Thermal Oxidizer
facility in Winona, Texas, October 1996